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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • leslie adkins Profile

    For those that don't have children or close siblings. Did you do the gene test, and why.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      There is no history of BC in my family (except for my father's aunt, who died at 87 of an unrelated illness). I have had breast cancer twice -- when I was 44 and when I was 56. After the second diagnosis they suggested the test and I am BRCA2+. As it turns out my sister is, as well. She...

      more

      There is no history of BC in my family (except for my father's aunt, who died at 87 of an unrelated illness). I have had breast cancer twice -- when I was 44 and when I was 56. After the second diagnosis they suggested the test and I am BRCA2+. As it turns out my sister is, as well. She wouldn't have known it unless I had been tested.
      I have had a bilateral mastectomy and my ovaries have been removed.

      The thing about the mutation is that it's in your entire family line, maternal or paternal. So even if you don't have siblings or children, there's a chance that other (even distant) family members may also have the mutation. From my perspective it was worth the test so my family can be more vigilant.

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I didn't have testing even though I am an only child and have no children. I had no relatives on either side of my parents families, cousins etc. who even had any kind of cancer. I was diagnosed at 59 postmenopausal ER+ PR+ Her2- I suppose it wouldn't hurt to have the testing. Although...

      more

      I didn't have testing even though I am an only child and have no children. I had no relatives on either side of my parents families, cousins etc. who even had any kind of cancer. I was diagnosed at 59 postmenopausal ER+ PR+ Her2- I suppose it wouldn't hurt to have the testing. Although Evelyn's story is enough to make on sit up and take notice. I really think my breast cancer was caused from over exposure to diagnostic radiation on my breast where breast cancer was found.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Cyndi Zimmerman Profile

    What is stage 2B breast cancer including lymph node ducts?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Cyndi this site has an excellent explanation of the various stages under the learn category. If you still have questions regarding your stage your oncologist

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Sorry I accidently hit the done key before finishing. But I was going to say ask your oncologist to explain in more details so that you are very clear on your stage.

      Comment
  • Emily Nhan Profile

    What are the chances of women receiving breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Michael Enette Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My Dad Is a 6 Year Male Breast cancer survivor

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Where is the best place to be treated for breast cancer? I live in Florida and my children want me to go to Washington DC to stay with them to get better treatment.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Both places are good - I would go to the place with the best support for you. Your children mean well- but are can they handle your chemo and doctors visits etc... It's hard for both parties but the best is when you have good support.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It probably has something to do with the type of breast cancer you have. Going through treatment it's nice not to be by yourself. What do you want to do? If you don't feel like you will get adequate carie in FL. Then you probably need to go so wen

      Comment

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