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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • sonali Singh Profile

    Do you have lose ur hair during chimo

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I lost all my hair, and all my body hair. My eyelashes and eyebrows were thelast to go.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I didn't lose all of mine but most of my head hair and all my pubic hair. My hairdresser felt I wouldn't lose any more head hair but I had her buzz what was left off as it became a nuisance. I didn't have to shave my arms and legs as often either and I think my eyebrows and lashes thinned out...

      more

      I didn't lose all of mine but most of my head hair and all my pubic hair. My hairdresser felt I wouldn't lose any more head hair but I had her buzz what was left off as it became a nuisance. I didn't have to shave my arms and legs as often either and I think my eyebrows and lashes thinned out some. I have a friend who lost hair everywhere on her body and some is still growing back in. My headhair has returned as has my pubic hair (darn with that part).

      Comment
  • melba mcrae Profile

    What does invasive biospy mean?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I had a local anesthestic for a core biopsy- a small incision was made to thread a the hollow needle through and extract tissue from 4 different quadrants of the tumor. It was ultra sound guided. It was still painful but i didn't need further biopsy as a fine needle may which can be inconclusive.

      1 comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Melba,

      Invasive generally means that something is going to go inside you to (in the case of a breast lump) take a biopsy. "Invasive" can include a needle or surgical biopsy. Do you have to go to a hospital or surgical center, or will it be done in a breast center or doctor's office?

      Comment
  • Mona Assadi Profile

    I'm 26 and I have been diagnosed with stage 2. Do I need a mastectomy??

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am 29 and based on the Size of the lump during ultrasound am borderline stage 1-2. I am doing 8 rounds of chemo before surgery in hopes of shrinking the tumor. Then only a lumpectomy will be needed. There are many different factors to consider though. Genetic testing to see if you are brca1 or...

      more

      I am 29 and based on the Size of the lump during ultrasound am borderline stage 1-2. I am doing 8 rounds of chemo before surgery in hopes of shrinking the tumor. Then only a lumpectomy will be needed. There are many different factors to consider though. Genetic testing to see if you are brca1 or brca2 positive, if there is more than one tumor, etc. Your doctor would be able to tell you if chemo first would be a good option for you. If you have any other questions feel free to ask me. I am more than willing to to help!

      Comment
    • Joan Rosov Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      I have had breast cancer twice. Both times I had genetic testing The results really helped in the decision process.

      Comment
  • Loni W Profile

    I want to know has anyone after breast cancer surgery started taking bioidenticals? My surgery was over a year ago and i just can not stand these hot flashs anymore.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • terri best Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Are you hormone receptor positive? If you are I believe it can be dangerous to take something that mimics estrogen. You don't want to feed cancer.

      2 comments
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I have bad hot flashes too and I am on Arimidex. Hope it gets better.

      Comment

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