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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Susan Green Profile

    My oncologist said that cancer could have spread even though I had a mastectomy with negative lymph nodes. Has anyone had this happen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    almost 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I think it all depends on the pathology of the breast cancer. There are so many other findings once a detailed report comes back one needs more information. Did you doctor say this in a context of recommending further treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation? There is probably always a...

      more

      I think it all depends on the pathology of the breast cancer. There are so many other findings once a detailed report comes back one needs more information. Did you doctor say this in a context of recommending further treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation? There is probably always a possibility of a cancer spreading but you / we need more information. If you are unsure about additional treatment, I would advise you to get a second opinion. Susan, good luck to you. There are a ba-zillion of us alive and well post breast cancer!

      4 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Well, dang I wrote a whole long bla-bla and somehow it vanished. The testing your doctor is waiting for is probably an "Oncotest DX" This test looks at the actual tumor cells and pathologists are able to grade them as to their probability of recurrance. If they are a higher grade on the scale,...

      more

      Well, dang I wrote a whole long bla-bla and somehow it vanished. The testing your doctor is waiting for is probably an "Oncotest DX" This test looks at the actual tumor cells and pathologists are able to grade them as to their probability of recurrance. If they are a higher grade on the scale, they will recommend further treatment. This way, if they are a low grade for recurrance, you won't be receiving unnecesary treatment. My brother-in-law had breast cancer and the onco DX and his cells were so low grade he didn't have to have any further treatment after his mastectomy. I did not have an onco test 4 years ago because I had one positive lymph node. (BUT...) My oncologist had just returned from a breast cancer symposium and there had been a completion of a study which benefited me. I only had to have 4 rounds of chemo because of the study because the study showed any more chemo would NOT benefit my type of breast cancer.....YAHOOOO! . Every single day, little advancements are made in diagnostics and treatments. The way it is going, treatments are becoming less drastic than they were in the past. This test you are waiting for does take longer than the other pathology for your tumor. This will be the final one in the line of all the diagnostics. You will move along to the next step. Susan, don't worry.... you will be ok. There are a ton of positive stories out here. Women are living long lives. I hope you keep in contact. We are a great big supportive group out here. We want to help other sisters who are going through this all too common battle. Again, please stay in touch. All the best to you, we all know what you are going through. Big healing hugs, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    is it possible to get breast cancer at 14?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      It is very rare for a fourteen year old to get breast cancer, however, if there is a lump or something unusual happening, I would strongly suggest talking to your mom and going to the doctor to get it checked out. Best of luck to you!

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Sweetie, it's SO unlikely for someone your age to get breast cancer! The odds are so very small they're almost zero. Your breasts are still growing and sometimes they get lumpy-bumpy. Sometimes, right around your period, your breasts will feel different. They might be a little sore and you...

      more

      Sweetie, it's SO unlikely for someone your age to get breast cancer! The odds are so very small they're almost zero. Your breasts are still growing and sometimes they get lumpy-bumpy. Sometimes, right around your period, your breasts will feel different. They might be a little sore and you might feel something that wasn't there a week ago. Most often it goes away after your period.

      Even with all that, though, you need to tell your Mom or an older woman you are close to, and ask them to take you do a doctor to get it checked out. It's the best, safest, smartest thing to do.

      Let us know how it goes!

      Comment
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Should you tell your 10 year old daughter if you've been diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Misty Wells Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes you should... my 10

      Comment
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, let her be a part of your journey. It will build your relationship and she will grow up understanding why early detection is so important.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What treatment is recommended for Triple negative breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2001
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Brandi Mixon Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      There are as many plans of treatment for BC as there are for people that have it. It is very individualized. I was diagnosed with stage 1 TNBC. I chose to have a double mastectomy (which I have been very happy with my decision) followed by six rounds of a TAC cocktail, Tacatere, Adrimycin,...

      more

      There are as many plans of treatment for BC as there are for people that have it. It is very individualized. I was diagnosed with stage 1 TNBC. I chose to have a double mastectomy (which I have been very happy with my decision) followed by six rounds of a TAC cocktail, Tacatere, Adrimycin, Cytoxan. A Nuelasta shot on the following day after each round. I do not have to have radiation because I had the bilateral mastectomy (that made me happy too and didn't even know that until after the surgery). I have my six month check up tomorrow and start my reconstruction surgery mid July. I was also in a blind blind clinical trial for some nausea meds. Don't know if they helped, but I had very little nausea.

      There are other treatments out there and you may choose an alternative route. Just do your research so you can make an educated decision on your treatment. It is YOUR treatment and you have to choose what is best for you.

      God bless you in whatever treatment you choose.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Your Dr's will come up with a plan that is taylor made for you. Which chemo drugs & dosage & maybe rads. Your gonna be ok. Chemo isn't as bad as you think. And triple neg responds very well to chemo. Prayers to you.

      Comment

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