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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Diane Lewey Profile

    What is the percentage of breast cancer recurrence for women who are treated with tamoxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Amanda Metivier Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Recurrence rates differ depending upon stage. Also depending upon adjunct therapy such as surgery, radiation and chemo.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    all of a sudden I have dark large veins on my breasts!Why

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • jennifer lewis Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Have you been thru any treatment? I know my radiation left some permanent spots on my breast.

      Comment
  • Darla Elliott Pruitt Profile

    I completed the AC for IDC breast cancer. 12 treatments of Taxol is next. I Didn't nt want to do taxol. I can't go to the neuropathy in my feet) or chemistry bran or more sore mouth. What is the real risk with 1A breast cancer???

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 3 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Your doctor has ordered what they feel is right for your cancer. As to those side effects you may or may not experience them as everyone is different. I did a TC regimen and those were listed as possible side effects with it too but I never had any. Talk with your doctor(s) about your concerns.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      As much as you want answers, we don't have them. If you read through the PDR about any drug on the market, the side effects will blow you over. Just because there are pages of side effect for Taxol, it still does not mean you will suffer those. As Betti says, we are all different. Usually...

      more

      As much as you want answers, we don't have them. If you read through the PDR about any drug on the market, the side effects will blow you over. Just because there are pages of side effect for Taxol, it still does not mean you will suffer those. As Betti says, we are all different. Usually what will happen, if you start developing the more bothersome side effects, they will discontinue the rest of the treatments. Again, we can't tell you the risk of recurrence for your particular type of breast cancer. You are just looking at one part of your diagnosis at a 1A. There are so many more factors that are now available that put the real meaning of your diagnosis in play. There is grade, hormone status, did you have an onco DX test to see what your chances of recurrence really were? If I were you, I would get a second or third opinion. There is nothing wrong with that. It would give you peace of mind to get more information. You need to talk to another oncologist's opinion outside the practice of your present oncologist. It will help you make better decisions. Please keep us posted. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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