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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    WHAT CANCER CANNOT DO: Cancer is so limited...It cannot cripple love. It cannot shatter hope. It cannot corrode faith. It cannot destroy peace. It cannot kill friendship. It cannot suppress memories. It cannot silence courage.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      That's awesome Norma, thanks so much for sharing. Very encouraging!

      1 comment
    • Renee' OK Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I love this. Thanks for sharing.

      1 comment
  • janice owens Profile

    My tumor was 2.3 cm labeled invasive ductal carcinoma. I don't have the rest of the data yet (like ER PR, etc) ,but would like to talk with others who have had similar biopsy results. I have not had lymph node mapping yet.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My diagnoses was/is invasive lobular stage 3 estrogen - nodes. You can beat cancer.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Janice,
      We share the same diagnosis.... same size tumor, same type of breast cancer. I also had one micro involvment of a lymph node. They kept telling me I did not have cancer in any of my lymph nodes... until the surgical path report came through. I then went from a stage 2A to a 2B. I am...

      more

      Janice,
      We share the same diagnosis.... same size tumor, same type of breast cancer. I also had one micro involvment of a lymph node. They kept telling me I did not have cancer in any of my lymph nodes... until the surgical path report came through. I then went from a stage 2A to a 2B. I am at the 5 year mark.... healthy and cancer free. I was ER+ PR+ Her2-. Grade 2-3 I chose to have a mastectomy, and chose not to have reconstruction.
      I could have had a lumpectomy. With a lumpectomy, I would have had to not only have chemo but 6 weeks of radiation. I did not want to have to make trips into the city for 6 weeks. (we live on an island and a trip includes a ferry ride) My breasts were small so a lumpectomy would have made my breast look like I had tangled with a great white shark. NOT attractive. I had 4 rounds of AC chemo. and 5 years of a hormone blocking drug. I was post menopausal (59) at the time of diagnosis. No family history of breast cancer. I had dense breast tissue and I had a mammogram and ultrasound 7 months before I found the lump. I was in total shock.
      You have been diagnosed with the most common form of breast cancer. We are very sorry you have joined our sisterhood, but this is a wonderful forum. We will help you by sharing our experiences with you. Don't be shy about asking anything. So sorry you were diagnosed but PLEASE understand, breast cancer is not a death sentence. Please don't go to the dark side and ask "What are my chances?" (winning the lottery? having all your teeth drop out the night before Thanksgiving?) We don't have expiration dates stamped on us! You will be scared at first, but we are here to help prop you up through the diagnosis time and throughout your treatment. The more you find out about your diagnosis and your treatment, you DO find some comfort in knowing what is going to take place. You WILL become such a warrior and march your way right through getting rid of this nasty, sneaky, disease. Hang in there, we are here for every one of our sisters. Take care, Sharon

      4 comments
  • Brittney Diaz-Mohammed Profile

    Im.22 and I have two lumps on both side one on the bottom and one on the side and lately I've been getting sharp pains were the lumps are . lately when I take my hot shower it hurts my breast and turn red

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Go get a mamo

      Comment
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Call your local hospital and talk to someone about financial help. I did and I got it.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How does breast cancer grow?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      From what I have read it's the multiplication of tumor cells. The normal cells turn malignant when there is a malfunction/mutation somewhere in the RNA and/or DNA. Then they grow rapidly and silently until a tumor has formed. Johns Hopkins (good web site to read) says that everybody has...

      more

      From what I have read it's the multiplication of tumor cells. The normal cells turn malignant when there is a malfunction/mutation somewhere in the RNA and/or DNA. Then they grow rapidly and silently until a tumor has formed. Johns Hopkins (good web site to read) says that everybody has cancer cells running around in their body. It's just a matter of whether or not they gather together and form a tumor.

      Comment

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