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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Why do a second digital mammogram after the initial one rather than ultrasound to look at a suspicious area?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Not all suspicious areas are found on ultrasounds. My pin point suspicious area on the mammogram was further seen on a diagnostic digital mammogram which they are able to do magnificated views. Where as on the ultrasound they could not find the area. The suspicious area did turn out to be DCIS...

      more

      Not all suspicious areas are found on ultrasounds. My pin point suspicious area on the mammogram was further seen on a diagnostic digital mammogram which they are able to do magnificated views. Where as on the ultrasound they could not find the area. The suspicious area did turn out to be DCIS caught very early and small. An ultrasound will show a mass or fluid filled cyst but cannot show scattered calcification. The usual course for an abnormal mammogram report is a follow up diagnostic mammogram with magnificated views followed by ultrasound or MRI

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      It has been my experience that the insurance makes the doctors jump through a few less expensive hoops before they get to go for the best diagnostic tool. :-( Jo

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What are chances for survival when spread to the liver?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I have been battling and maintaining stage IV with mets to lungs since 2009. To me my survival rate is what I choose it to be, stable healthy blessed and happy. A person has to get a mind set that you are in charge and plan the best journey you can and putting the odds in your corner. Keep a...

      more

      I have been battling and maintaining stage IV with mets to lungs since 2009. To me my survival rate is what I choose it to be, stable healthy blessed and happy. A person has to get a mind set that you are in charge and plan the best journey you can and putting the odds in your corner. Keep a positive out look. I'm not saying it is all peachy, but there is good in everything if you look long and hard. Good luck and strong living

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Nobody has a crystal ball. There are probably statistics but there are so many variables it would be useless to try to figure it out. I always figure, statistics are just numbers. Would it make your life BETTER, if you heard some low number thrown at you? You seek treatment, we have lots of...

      more

      Nobody has a crystal ball. There are probably statistics but there are so many variables it would be useless to try to figure it out. I always figure, statistics are just numbers. Would it make your life BETTER, if you heard some low number thrown at you? You seek treatment, we have lots of women who have mets to bone, lung, liver, and are living a life but consider it a chronic disease. Hang in there, Sharon

      Comment
  • lynn hall Profile

    So what does the grade mean? I was told I had grade 3.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2008
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Lynn, tumor grade means how fast your particular tumor grows. The grade of tumors is 1-4. (4 being the fastest growing). Tumor grade should not be confused with the stage of a cancer. Cancer stage refers to the extent or severity of the cancer, based on factors such as the location of the...

      more

      Hi Lynn, tumor grade means how fast your particular tumor grows. The grade of tumors is 1-4. (4 being the fastest growing). Tumor grade should not be confused with the stage of a cancer. Cancer stage refers to the extent or severity of the cancer, based on factors such as the location of the primary tumor, tumor size, number of tumors, and lymph node involvement (spread of cancer into lymph nodes). Hope this helps. :)

      Comment
    • Cathy Wadkins Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Lynn, this is what I learned you have different stages in 3 because I tell people I caught it in the nick of time. It wasn't in my tissues or bone but it was in my lymphs 6 out of 25. I had to discover all my answers by stumbling on them

      Comment
  • Hailey Wilson Profile

    I'm in the 7th grade one of my breasts hurts, off and on. Occasionaly, here's daily clear or greenish discharge. I went to the doctor and got an ultra sound. They told my mom the results but she won't tell me. What's wrong...could this be breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Nancy L Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hailey,
      It's common to have breast pain with your period, when your breasts swell each month. Think about the timing of your pain. Usually breast cancer does not hurt.
      If your mom can't or won't talk to you about this, I suggest calling your doctor's office and speaking to the nurse. Another...

      more

      Hailey,
      It's common to have breast pain with your period, when your breasts swell each month. Think about the timing of your pain. Usually breast cancer does not hurt.
      If your mom can't or won't talk to you about this, I suggest calling your doctor's office and speaking to the nurse. Another idea: ask your school nurse.
      Take care.

      Comment
    • Jessica Fisher Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      Your very young and it's very rare at your age but possible, I was diagnosed at 29 and my chances of getting breast cancer was .04%. I'm sure if it were cancer your mom would not keep that from you also an ultrasound will not tell you it's cancer a biopsy is required to make that diagnosis! Talk...

      more

      Your very young and it's very rare at your age but possible, I was diagnosed at 29 and my chances of getting breast cancer was .04%. I'm sure if it were cancer your mom would not keep that from you also an ultrasound will not tell you it's cancer a biopsy is required to make that diagnosis! Talk to your mom it's your body and you have every right to know what's going on with it, or try calling your DR yourself:)

      1 comment

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