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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Brandi Carey Profile

    so this is a personal ?? how old were u all when u were diagnosed& what sent u to the dr?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 40 answers
    • View all 40 answers
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yearly mammogram at age 57...this year. Had biopsy, two surgeries, radiation that gave me second degree burns and now on Arimidex for five years. Mammogram three weeks ago....CANCER FREE!,,

      3 comments
    • Nancy Ries Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Brandi, I was 63 when I was diagnosed in September 2011. My cancer was found very early (stage 1a) because of the timing of my annual mammogram. Mammogram, stereotactic needle biopsy and surgical biopsy. Radiation and now four more years of hormone blocking medication. Good luck on your journey....

      more

      Brandi, I was 63 when I was diagnosed in September 2011. My cancer was found very early (stage 1a) because of the timing of my annual mammogram. Mammogram, stereotactic needle biopsy and surgical biopsy. Radiation and now four more years of hormone blocking medication. Good luck on your journey. This is a supportive network of strong women.

      Comment
  • Carla Pugliese Profile

    For the past three weeks I have been having a pain in my right nipple...is this something I should be concerned about?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Carla,
      It is always best to have something that ISN'T normal for you, checked. My rule for making an appointment.... if it has bothered me for more than two weeks or if it seems to be getting worse, I make an appointment. You are obviously concerned about this, and it is not normal for you,...

      more

      Carla,
      It is always best to have something that ISN'T normal for you, checked. My rule for making an appointment.... if it has bothered me for more than two weeks or if it seems to be getting worse, I make an appointment. You are obviously concerned about this, and it is not normal for you, give yourself some peace of mind and get it checked. The vast majority of these things are hormonal and benign but please have it checked anyway. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      As Sharon said, any changes anywhere in the body need to be checked by a doctor. Make an appointment and have it looked at.

      Comment
  • nancy  wilcox Profile

    I really want to know what Sharon, Diana, and Marianne think.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Well I am not one of these three people, but I am an ICU nurse and am a survivor of breast cancer. The nurse used the word "probably" because she has probably seen a preliminary report. Was she reading those words from a piece of paper, was it your nurse, or was she the one doing the MRI, was...

      more

      Well I am not one of these three people, but I am an ICU nurse and am a survivor of breast cancer. The nurse used the word "probably" because she has probably seen a preliminary report. Was she reading those words from a piece of paper, was it your nurse, or was she the one doing the MRI, was she just talking to you and used those words? Sometimes as nurses we use words that we dont realize will have such a big impact on people. I learned that being a patient myself. Like "it will be ok", "quick little pinch", " probably". That nurse doesnt have the final result so she cant say that it is 100 percent negative, but she can say what she said to you to give you reassurance that it is probably negative with no mets. Although it ended up not being very reassuring to you. I guess to sum up-try not to focus on her words over the weekend. It will make you miserable. Remain positive and try to enjoy your weekend. Waiting is the hardest part, I know. I always told my caregivers-dont tell me "your going to be ok", tell me "your going to do great". I wish nothing but the best for you.

      1 comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Nancy, I agree with the ladies. It's a preliminary report....that's true. But not knowing and having to wait on the final results are terrifying. I'm so glad you decided to do the MRI. It is so much more accurate than a mammogram or ultrasound! I know from experience. I'm with Sharon...I have...

      more

      Hi Nancy, I agree with the ladies. It's a preliminary report....that's true. But not knowing and having to wait on the final results are terrifying. I'm so glad you decided to do the MRI. It is so much more accurate than a mammogram or ultrasound! I know from experience. I'm with Sharon...I have a good feeling about the results. I know how difficult it is. But try to do things this weekend that you enjoy doing. Monday will be here soon. You will be in my thoughts & prayers Nancy. Lots of hopeful hugs!!!! Diana

      2 comments
  • Ali S Profile

    How do I go about telling someone, that I'm newly dating, that I was getting breast cancer treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    almost 8 years 1 answer
    • Brooke Lancaster Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I'm curious on this question too. I am 33 and single. I would love to be able to date again, but I am afraid to talk about my Breast Cancer with a future suitor. I think with me it's a physical insecurity I'm going thru right now. I'm almost done with chemo, so I keep telling myself once I'm done...

      more

      I'm curious on this question too. I am 33 and single. I would love to be able to date again, but I am afraid to talk about my Breast Cancer with a future suitor. I think with me it's a physical insecurity I'm going thru right now. I'm almost done with chemo, so I keep telling myself once I'm done with treatment and dell like myself again.

      For you, wait to talk about it for when you feel the most comfortable. I'm sure he will be there for you thru this time. What treatment are you going thru at this time? Best wishes.

      Brooke

      3 comments

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