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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Does double mastectomy mean removing both breasts? My grandmother just got diagnose with breast cancer again. She's now had it in both breasts so it makes sense, but I'm only fourteen so I'm lost.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Yes double mastectomy does mean removal of both breasts. I had a double mastectomy march 14 th 2010. I was 49. It is very confusing and scary. I tried to keep in mind my breasts were not something I needed to keep alive, but if they were not removed that would be a likely possibility. So the...

      more

      Yes double mastectomy does mean removal of both breasts. I had a double mastectomy march 14 th 2010. I was 49. It is very confusing and scary. I tried to keep in mind my breasts were not something I needed to keep alive, but if they were not removed that would be a likely possibility. So the decesion was not difficult for me. Each person's situation is different, I had chemo before mastectomy, the mastectomy and then more chemo. I was in the hospital for the mastectomy for 7 days. I went home with 4 drains in. I got the drains taken out 2weeks after surg. I returned to work on the 4th or 5th week after surg. I healed well. I had to do some self physical therapy to get my right arm back to normal from where they took out some lymph nodes. I now have complete use of both arms with no swelling. You and/or your grandmother need to consult with her Ono team. Your local cancer center treatment center is a good resource to get in formation. The Internet is ok, but some times it can scare a person. As mentioned above it will be a great help and comfort for her if you are there to support her. Good luck and wish you both well and speedy recovery.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      Double mastectomy is the removal of both breasts. I hope you will talk to your grandmother and give her lots of encouragement. Prayers for her recovery!

      Comment
  • Susan Egan Profile
  • kristina ware Profile

    my surgery went great. doc says my cancer is non estrogen receptive. what does that mean?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Just means your treatment plan will be different than that of someone who has hormone positive cancer. I have HER2 positive cancer (or did, I should say!) so I was treated with a drug called herceptin every 3 weeks (I have one left). Some women are triple negative which means there are no...

      more

      Just means your treatment plan will be different than that of someone who has hormone positive cancer. I have HER2 positive cancer (or did, I should say!) so I was treated with a drug called herceptin every 3 weeks (I have one left). Some women are triple negative which means there are no common receptors present. Anyway, your treatment plan will be individualized according to your type, stage, etc.

      Comment
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      It means that hormones did not cause or feed your cancer...like mine did. So many factors to be considered for your treatment. Keep the communication open with your onc. Prayers for you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can the surgeon see that there is nothing wrong with the fluid from a needle biopsy and decide not to have it tested?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      If that is what your surgeon did I would get myself a second opinion and this time make sure it is tested.

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      If that's your doctor's approach I would definitely seek another opinion. Rarely do breast surgeons take that approach. Whoever you see, insist that this be chased down until you get a definitive answer. It may require a surgical biopsy and a pathology read, but you absolutely DO NOT want this...

      more

      If that's your doctor's approach I would definitely seek another opinion. Rarely do breast surgeons take that approach. Whoever you see, insist that this be chased down until you get a definitive answer. It may require a surgical biopsy and a pathology read, but you absolutely DO NOT want this to sit.

      I suggest you be as proactive as possible on this. As you probably know, "watching" a lump or suspicious area can cause major problems if it is malignant. Please know, though, that many lumps are NOT cancer. You just need to be sure.

      Good luck to to you!

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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