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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 4 - Biopsy

A biopsy is a diagnostic procedure in which cells are removed from a suspicious area to check for the presence of breast cancer. There are three types of biopsy: fine needle aspiration, core needle biopsy, and surgical biopsy.

Let’s discuss the different types in greater detail.

Fine Needle Aspiration
(FNA)/Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNABx)

If the lump is easily accessible, or if the doctor suspects that it may be a fluid-filled cystic lump, the doctor may choose to conduct a fine needle aspiration (FNA). During this procedure, the lump should collapse once the fluid inside has been drawn and discarded. Sometimes, an ultrasound is used to help your doctor guide the needle to the exact site. If the lump persists, the radiologist or surgeon will perform a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNABx), a similar procedure using the needle to obtain cells from the lump for examination.

Core Needle Biopsy
Core needle biopsy is the procedure to remove a small amount of tissue from the breasts with a larger “core” needle. Similar to fine needle aspiration, an ultrasound might be used to help your doctor guide the needle to the exact site. Once removed, the suspicious area tissue will be examined for traces of cancer.

Surgical Biopsy
(also known as wide local excision)
During a surgical (or wide local excision) biopsy, the doctor will remove all or part of the lump from the breast as well as a small amount of normal-looking tissue. This procedure is often performed in a hospital with the patient under local anesthesia. If the lump cannot be easily felt, an ultrasound might be used to help guide your doctor to the suspicious area. Once removed, the abnormal tissue will be examined for traces of cancer. The surrounding margin, or small amount of normal–looking tissue, will be examined to determine if the cancer has been completely removed.

Many times after core and surgical biopsies, a marker is placed internally at the biopsy site. This is done so that if further surgery is required, the surgeon can more easily locate the abnormal area.

Related Questions

  • Sheila Anderson Profile

    I am waiting on biopsy of my breast. Has anyone had double mastectomy with reconstruction? I was thinking implants. Wanted to think about treatment options. Is it a good idea to take everything out to save my life and prevent recurrence ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      That's exactly what I did. Both surgeons, oncologist and plastic, working together, at the same surgery. I had expanders put on. It's really uncomfortable, but they're temporary. Now I'm done, with the right implants on, niples and tattoos! No regrets at all!!

      1 comment
    • Casey Chernes Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi, I had a lump in my right breast... Was diagnosed stage 2 before surgery... They can't do full staging until after surgery... I chose a double mastectomy hoping my chances of reacurance would be lessened... I had the DIEP flap reconstruction... Had a little trouble with my left breast nit...

      more

      Hi, I had a lump in my right breast... Was diagnosed stage 2 before surgery... They can't do full staging until after surgery... I chose a double mastectomy hoping my chances of reacurance would be lessened... I had the DIEP flap reconstruction... Had a little trouble with my left breast nit taking so I will have to have an implant on the left... But everyone is different... Hope this helped!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How can you tell a tumor from hard tissue from treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Daphne Beitman Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Get to know your breasts by doing monthly self exams and note/keep track of any abnormalities you believe you feel. A tumor will grow, normal dense tissue will not. When in doubt have your doctor schedule a mammogram, especially if you're under 40 years old with a family history of the disease....

      more

      Get to know your breasts by doing monthly self exams and note/keep track of any abnormalities you believe you feel. A tumor will grow, normal dense tissue will not. When in doubt have your doctor schedule a mammogram, especially if you're under 40 years old with a family history of the disease. If you you have no family history have a yearly mammogram beginning at 40.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I want to use this medium to share my testimony to the public, hopefully to safe life also, Am Brandi Harri, I was diagnosed of Breast Cancer Three years ago, when i had my last baby, my world came crashing down when my Doctor told me that nothing could be done to save me after fighting this...

      more

      I want to use this medium to share my testimony to the public, hopefully to safe life also, Am Brandi Harri, I was diagnosed of Breast Cancer Three years ago, when i had my last baby, my world came crashing down when my Doctor told me that nothing could be done to save me after fighting this deadly disease with Chemo And Radiation for Two Years but i refused to sit back and wait until the day it finally decides to take my life so i went in search of help which i found in the hands of Priest Babaka through his Cannabis oil/Herb Soap Supplement. God use him to bring life back to me and gave my life a meaning again,am alive now all because of him, sir God will continue to Bless you and your family for this good work and word of truth..If you have any issue of CANCER don't hestitate to contact him with this email : babaka.wolf@gmail.com

      Comment
  • Tamara Thom Profile

    Lumpectomy and sentinel node biopsy 4 weeks ago now....but the last two days pain has returned and I can feel a ropey line from nipple to shoulder and it also hurts. Has anyone else had this happen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    almost 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • cindy stephenson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Could be scar tissue or cording- call your surgeon and let them know. You may need physical therapy. You also want to make sure no infection

      Comment
    • Cheryl Wornham Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes call you surgeon tell him what's going on

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My mother is 69 yrs old. just diagnosed with L breast cancer, pending biopsy. She is resident of USAbut not citizen, DOESN'T HAVE ANY INSURANCE, how can I get her treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I would contact the American Cancer Society, Planned Parenthood, and Susan G. Komen Foundation. They would be sources of information for your Mom's treatment.

      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Vicki Geer Fournier Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I would also contact the state you live in to see if they have sort of plan for women with breast cancer. I live in New Hampshire & New Hampshire & Maine have a "no women be left behind" progam (Breast & Cervical Cancer program). I am on that & once I was diagnosed I automatically was approved...

      more

      I would also contact the state you live in to see if they have sort of plan for women with breast cancer. I live in New Hampshire & New Hampshire & Maine have a "no women be left behind" progam (Breast & Cervical Cancer program). I am on that & once I was diagnosed I automatically was approved for Medicaid (but only for the breast cancer) What a relief it was not to have to worry about the bills. GOOD LUCK!

      Comment

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