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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Giselle dominguez  Profile

    My mommy starts chemo August 9 - I'm guessing this is the hard part that's coming but we are being strong for her .... Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 8 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      - First of all, I know people care about us and they just want to be there, be helpful, and simpathyze with what we are going through. But, please, please, please, do not tell us you understand what we are feeling if you never had to go through cancer surgeries, treatments, etc. Believe me, YOU...

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      - First of all, I know people care about us and they just want to be there, be helpful, and simpathyze with what we are going through. But, please, please, please, do not tell us you understand what we are feeling if you never had to go through cancer surgeries, treatments, etc. Believe me, YOU DO NOT KNOW what we are feeling!

      - I respect all the religions, and I do not try to impose my believes on anyone. So, please, do not bring your religion to me. You can pray for me. And, please, do it! It means you care about me! And I would love to know you are doing it! But DO NOT tell me “God (does not matter which one!) does not give you more than you can handle” – so it means that if I can not handle this God is joking with me? And what about all the people who died from the same thing, it was God’s mistake? Ops, I am sorry, that is it???

      - We need friends around to help us and to keep us from feeling alone. But must be the kind of friend that will not feel bad if we do not walk them to the door, or we just fall sleep – it is good to take a nap knowing a good friend is watching over us! Loneliness is a huge bad monster after us when we are sick.

      - We need people who understand if we fall apart it is because this is freaking scary, painful, and our hormones are a big mess – we do not need anyone telling us things are going to be all right, because we know that! We just need a shoulder for a good cry!

      - Light movies! Does not matter if it is a comedy, drama, romance, action, they need to be light with happy endings – watch out not to get movies where somebody has cancer: WE DO NOT WANT TO KNOW ABOUT ANY OTHER CANCER! THE CANCER WE HAVE IS THE MOST IMPORTANT IN THE WORLD RIGHT NOW, for us! Also they need to be light because we probably will fall sleep, or could not concentrate (chemo brain!).

      - Fun, light and entertaining books – but watch out, looks like taking our boobs out has a deep relation with our ability to concentrate in a long story (chemo brain again!)! Short story books are better.

      - Cute little gifts. Cute comfortable socks, soft blanket, a soft light (not heavy) pillow so we can hug to sleep – the position is pretty uncomfortable.

      - Our favorite smoothie, coffee, cake, sandwich, chocolate…. Treats! Treats! Treats! We do not need to eat healthy while in chemo, we just need to eat, what is really hard to do! So, if we ask you for junk food, give it to us!

      - Really important is not to hear from anyone: “your cancer”. It is NOT our cancer, it is NOT my cancer! We did not buy it. We did not chose it! We did not put it there! It is an ALIEN that invaded our body!

      - REALLY IMPORTANT: do not tell us about a tea, herbs, supplements, alternative medicine, graviola leaf tea, green tea

      4 comments
    • Janice Baker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      She will be very tired and very sensitive to any smells so please don't wear cologne or cook any thing with strong odors. That was the hardest for me was the odors. Praying for you and your family!

      1 comment
  • Judy Carr Profile

    Diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday - how do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • lynda dew Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      That was the hardest thing about any of it. We sat our two children down. We named two of our friends who went through the same thing. We told them that I went to the doctor and we had some news. My daughter started to cry and sobbed "no, no". I held her and reminded her that those two women...

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      That was the hardest thing about any of it. We sat our two children down. We named two of our friends who went through the same thing. We told them that I went to the doctor and we had some news. My daughter started to cry and sobbed "no, no". I held her and reminded her that those two women fought hard and they won the fight and I was going to do the same. My daughter said "you don't even look sick". I explained that that day was the sickest I was going to be. I told them that when I looked tired, lost my hair and looked really sick to say a prayer and thank God for chemo because the worse I looked, meant that it was working. Five months of chemo, lumpectomy, bi-later mastectomies and six weeks of radiation, I am in full remission and plan on being here for a long time. Tell your kids, comfort them, be strong and keep them involved. They won't be scared if you are honest (what they can handle at their age).. Good luck:). I'm praying for you.

      1 comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Ah, Judy. I've been there, twice. You don't mention how old your kids are. The first time, mine were 7, 5, and 5 (twins). The second time they were 18, 16, and 16. The words I used were different each time, but the message was the same. I have great doctors, I trust them, and they tell me...

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      Ah, Judy. I've been there, twice. You don't mention how old your kids are. The first time, mine were 7, 5, and 5 (twins). The second time they were 18, 16, and 16. The words I used were different each time, but the message was the same. I have great doctors, I trust them, and they tell me that they're going to give me the best treatment they can so I can get better. I never made any promises, but I gave them as much hope as I could. I'm on the other side of it all now, having finished chemo in March. I'm alive and well. No matter what age your kids are, they understand more than you think -- in their own way. They take their cues from you (and your partner, if you have one). Despite my own fear I tried my best to stay positive for them. They wanted frequent reassurance that everything was going to be ok. While I didn't quite go that far, I consistently told them that I was getting the best care I could so I could get well.
      It's very hard, I know. Best of luck and please send any other questions you might have.

      Comment
  • vicky kayley Profile

    Last chemo today yipee can not believe how quickly it has gone, start rads on 4th September. The light is getting near x x

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 20 answers
    • View all 20 answers
    • vicky kayley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thank you all for the lovely comments, I really can not believe how quickly it has gone. Good luck to all still in chemo it will be done before you know it , lots of hugs to all x x

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      YIPPEE!!!! What a great place to be. You made it through the chemo and now on to another step.... closer and closer to the end of your treatment. We are all celebrating with you! Pony-Fur Hugs to you! Sharon

      Comment
  • Aleeza Chaudhry Profile

    My mom has about two more months of chemo, five weeks of radiation, and five years of tamoxifen left for her treatment. She keeps asking when her life and body will go back to normal. Any idea of when her body will start recovering after chemo/radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      After chemo an rad it took my body almost 2-1/2 months. I wish I could say sooner but it was almost at the 3 month mark.
      Praying hers is much sooner. Tell her to hang in there. It will get better. For now take advantage and rest.
      God, water, walk in that order and u can survive anything.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      She's in the worst of it right now and it can be discouraging. I am 4 months post chemo and 8 weeks post radiation and I am feeling pretty good, but at night I am still physically exhausted.
      She will develop a new level of normal after all this. Once chemo is over keep her busy with family things...

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      She's in the worst of it right now and it can be discouraging. I am 4 months post chemo and 8 weeks post radiation and I am feeling pretty good, but at night I am still physically exhausted.
      She will develop a new level of normal after all this. Once chemo is over keep her busy with family things and things she used to do. It will really help.

      1 comment

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