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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • D D Profile

    What can I expect from a surgery biopsy and how soon are the results shared? A lump on breast is about 3.5 cm was aspirated and resulted in a bloody liquid and revealed another behind it. (3cm with hardened walls and atypical cells...I'm scared)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi DD, yes it's very scary waiting. It usually takes at least two days (sometimes longer) to get the biopsy results in. While you're waiting ...know that 80% of biopsies are negative. I pray you're in that 80%. Hugs

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was scared too so I know how you feel. Try not to worry until you know for sure what is going on. Remember God loves you and will help you through if you just ask.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My Grandma who is at least 70 was just diagnosed with breast cancer. This is the second time this has happened except this time it is stage 2. She is going to do chemo and have one breast removed. But I'm scared I will lose her. Am I going to lose her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am so sorry your Grandma has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Rest assured she has an EXCELLENT chance of beating this again. It sounds as if this was caught at an early stage. She would not want you to worry for her. Many women here have the same type of treatment as she will go...

      more

      I am so sorry your Grandma has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Rest assured she has an EXCELLENT chance of beating this again. It sounds as if this was caught at an early stage. She would not want you to worry for her. Many women here have the same type of treatment as she will go through. We are fine and living wonderful lives. She will probably need your help as she is going through her treatment. You are a wonderful caring Granddaughter, and your Grandma is a very lucky woman!
      Hugs to you, Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • anonymous Profile

    Here's my question...I just turned 33, found out last night that I will have a bilateral and chemo can anyone help me out on what to expect as far as the chemo and reconstruction or any other helpful information?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Anonymous, I know we are all so sorry to hear at such a young age, you have breast cancer. Every woman's breast cancer is different on a cellular level. There are many factors and findings that go into the decision how your treatment will go. It depends on what type of breast cancer you have,...

      more

      Anonymous, I know we are all so sorry to hear at such a young age, you have breast cancer. Every woman's breast cancer is different on a cellular level. There are many factors and findings that go into the decision how your treatment will go. It depends on what type of breast cancer you have, the stage, the grade, and your age. You are in limbo right now because you are still being tested. Once your team have your treatment schedule set, your life will settle down. I can tell you, where you are right now is lousy. We really don't know what your treatment will be. As far as chemotherapy, everybody handles it differently. Some people it is tough, other people, like myself, it was relatively easy. They have very good druges to keep you from getting nauseated. You WILL lose your hair. That is a --for sure--. It starts to drop out at about 2 weeks after your first treatment. I did not have reconstruction but usually if you have a mastectomy and you are going to have reconstruction, they place tissue expanders to make a pocket for implants. There are other types of reconstruction and that will be discussed with you depending on your specific circumstance.
      A suggestion for you while you are going through this diagnosis phase, take a spouse, relative and good friend to take notes and listen to what is being said. I did not remember a third of what was said. Thankfully, my husband and best friend came along to help me through this tough time. You have got to be your own best advocate. You have got to speak up, ask questions, and make sure you are getting the correct medication. Every woman's treatment will be different because it is not individualized for each woman. It is a long journey, but you will come out the other side a much stronger woman. Breast cancer treatment ain't for wimps! Hang in there.... you WILL make it!
      Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • sandra hayley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and had a mastectomy and chemo in 2006, had breast cancer again in 2011, had surgery and radiation. Think positive! You can beat this! I also found out I have the brca2 gene(breast cancer gene) I am now 41 and trying to stay positive and eat healthy and...

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      I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and had a mastectomy and chemo in 2006, had breast cancer again in 2011, had surgery and radiation. Think positive! You can beat this! I also found out I have the brca2 gene(breast cancer gene) I am now 41 and trying to stay positive and eat healthy and exercise regularly.

      1 comment
  • Giselle dominguez  Profile

    My mom was recently told she was in stage 2 of breast cancer - I'm really scared and want to know how bad is stage 2?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Janice Baker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Its going to be okay. I am a survivor that was diagnosed with stage 3c. I have completed surgery, chemo and radiation. My cancer also went into my lymph nodes. I'm praying for you and your mom.

      1 comment
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast...

      more

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast cancer or your mom is younger than 40, you might talk to your doctor (&/or hers) about genetic testing. They have identified gene mutations that drastically increase your risk of breast & ovarian cancer. I don't mean to freak you out or imply that anyone in your family has one of these gene mutations, I am merely passing on information that might prove helpful.

      Like Diana, I recommend your mom get in touch with other women who have or have survived breast cancer. She may meet some during treatment or you can help her search for a local support group.

      And at 10 weeks pregnant, your mom has plenty of time to enjoy your pregnancy! If she begins chemo treatments or undergoes surgery soon, I'm sure just thinking about you & that little one will lift her spirits & help her fight. You ladies can get through this! I'll keep you all in my most positive of thoughts.
      Sending Love!

      1 comment

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