loading... close

Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Betsy Chapin Profile

    I am struggling with how cancer consumes my everyday thoughts. This month is especially difficult when we are bombarded with pink everywhere. I finished treatment 7 months ago and I still have it on my mind everyday. When will it go away?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2010
    over 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Betsy, unfortunately I can't answer that. I often wonder the same. Will it ever end? I am still in the middle of my treatments. I finished my last chemo just a few weeks ago and will have a double mastectomy in less than two weeks. Then finally radiation. And you're right...pink is everywhere...

      more

      Hi Betsy, unfortunately I can't answer that. I often wonder the same. Will it ever end? I am still in the middle of my treatments. I finished my last chemo just a few weeks ago and will have a double mastectomy in less than two weeks. Then finally radiation. And you're right...pink is everywhere this month. Of course you and I...and all the other women

      Comment
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Thank you to each and every one of you for answering. You have really helped me become more optimistic about this and I know this all consuming breast cancer feeling shall pass. In most moments of the day, I am the happiest I have ever been in my life due to my cancer journey. Time shall heal and...

      more

      Thank you to each and every one of you for answering. You have really helped me become more optimistic about this and I know this all consuming breast cancer feeling shall pass. In most moments of the day, I am the happiest I have ever been in my life due to my cancer journey. Time shall heal and cancer will stay in the background of my life. Today is a good day!

      Comment
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Any ideas on how to tell my 10 year old daughter I have breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have a 10 year old and year old. I just told both kids one month ago. I told them when I knew I would not be hysterical about it. It is all in your delivery. My kids have been fine.

      Comment
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also...

      more

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also be helpful to come up with an outline of topics that you want to cover, because your talk with your daughter will likely become emotional and you may forget what you wanted to say.

      Here is a link to a short article in Parents that may be helpful: http://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/6-ways-to-tell-your-kids-about-breast-cancer/

      Also, remember that you are not alone. Not too long ago, on this site, someone else asked the question "How do I tell my kids". Click on this question and you can see some suggestions from women who have also had to do this: http://beyondtheshock.com/questions/561

      I am so sorry to hear about your diagnosis, but am wishing you the best. Stay strong and keep hope!

      Comment
  • Ally Chapis  Profile

    How do I try to cheer my mom up during treatment? What can I do to make her feel better?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the...

      more

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the dishes, keep her paperwork organized, keep myself educated on her medications so I know what to expect, keep a log of when she has taken medication and when she has eaten (this helps to know when she can take another dose & whatnot), I act as sort of an eager slave to get her water or food or whatever she might want, & I try to make her laugh. I also let her cry & complain without always trying to cheer her up. She needs to get that sadness/pain/frustration out & I don't want her to feel she can't. I validate her feelings & then offer whatever love & support I can. All of this is also a huge help to her fiancé (if your father is also in the house). When he comes home from work, I encourage him to take some time to himself before taking over caring for my friend. And I know helping out around the house really helps relieve stress for him. He also reads to her every night. Which is something anyone can do.

      All of the answers given cover it...just being there makes a huge difference. But I thought I'd offer some ideas of what I've done. :-) My best to you & your family.

      Comment
    • Lori A Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom is still going through her treatments and I did her wash, made food and she stayed with me after her surgery.

      Comment
  • Sue Rice Profile

    Stage 4 HER2+ ER+ --> Treatment is taking forever. Others finish, but I keep going. Do any others feel lonely, frustrated and depressed while watching others finish? I'm stable, but only if I continue treatment.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    almost 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Donna Ginnings Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2001

      Sue, I'm stage 4 and have been since 2007. I was able to stop treatment for 3 years because of no sign of disease after first year of treatment. A miracle from God for sure. Currently I have been on chemo since July 2010. I just look at it as a small inconvenience and enjoy every day God gives...

      more

      Sue, I'm stage 4 and have been since 2007. I was able to stop treatment for 3 years because of no sign of disease after first year of treatment. A miracle from God for sure. Currently I have been on chemo since July 2010. I just look at it as a small inconvenience and enjoy every day God gives me with my daughters. Trust in the Lord, he will see you through. So many good treatment options out there that let you carry on a normal life. God never promised us life would be easy, but he did promise nerver to leave us or forsake us. may God bless you!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sue, I sure can understand how it could be very depressing to watch the other types of breast cancer women walk out the door. Your oncologist's office probably has some recommendations for support groups in your area where you could meet a pal who is dealing with the same issues you are having. ...

      more

      Sue, I sure can understand how it could be very depressing to watch the other types of breast cancer women walk out the door. Your oncologist's office probably has some recommendations for support groups in your area where you could meet a pal who is dealing with the same issues you are having. When I was going through treatment, there was a young woman on the other side of the states who was a horse-gal, just like me. We had a great time emailing each other even though she was young enough to be my daughter. It was so welcome to find somebody else who was in the "same leaky boat" as I was. It made the treatment time much easier to take. You just need a "chemo-pal." This has become a way-too-common disease to there are lots of us out there. I would try to find a support group and maybe one person who you just click with. . Be sure and talk to your doctor and Onco. nurses about how you are feeling. Ask them if they can point you in the direction of a support group. You sound like a very social person and needs some buddies. Take care and big healing hugs. Sharon

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word