loading... close

Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Lois Croley Profile

    After radiation, when should I start taking tamoxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 1 answer
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      The day after I stopped radiation I began taking Tamoxifen. I believe this is common but your oncologist will surely be the one to advise you on this.

      Comment
  • Sara Palmer Profile

    My sister was diagnosed with Stage 2 triple negative breast cancer. We live in different states at the moment, but what can I do to help and support her through her treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would recommend sending lots of cards.
      A friend of mine gave me a small gift after every procedure. This was something nice to look forward to each time. Call her often, listen to her fears and worries. It is a rough road but she will remember the sweet touches.

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Tell her not to google triple negative. The info is outdated and scared me!!! I'm through 2/3 of my treatment and the little triple negative jerk is gone, chemo works well with it!

      Send her cards each week or more often and write personal messages that you love her, youre thinking of her, etc. ...

      more

      Tell her not to google triple negative. The info is outdated and scared me!!! I'm through 2/3 of my treatment and the little triple negative jerk is gone, chemo works well with it!

      Send her cards each week or more often and write personal messages that you love her, youre thinking of her, etc. also, little gifts help--like send her something each week or every 2 weeks or something. Comedy books (Tina fey's bossypants was funny, also the S*%! My dad says helped me when I couldn't sleep. Assuming she's having chemo, send her a few scarves and/or hats. Maybe a thin hat for sleeping.

      Gossip, jokes, all that helps too. Don't make every correspondence about cancer bc she wants to feel normal too.

      See if you can help set up a meal calendar among her friends/neighbors/colleagues. Cooked meals made a difference when I was too run down after chemo to cook.
      Best wishes

      1 comment
  • Betsy Krueger Profile

    What is a good cream for a mastectomy scar?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    about 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Alison Johnson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I like eucerine, it's at most pharmacies. 2 year after treatment and I still use it each night.

      2 comments
    • Betsy Krueger Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Thanks for the continuing suggestions. Since my separate surgeries, I used Mederma on scars. I waited till scars stopped feeling so tender after all the scabs healed. I still look somewhat like I had open-heart surgery,

      I look better as time goes on. I'll always know that I had the...

      more

      Thanks for the continuing suggestions. Since my separate surgeries, I used Mederma on scars. I waited till scars stopped feeling so tender after all the scabs healed. I still look somewhat like I had open-heart surgery,

      I look better as time goes on. I'll always know that I had the surgeries, but the scar tissue on each side of scars no longer looks so reddish and painful. I think, too, that the rubbing I did. It helped me not think it was weird and ugly, and it has helped me not feel so regretful that all the cancer occurred. Maybe that's part of "touch."

      Thank, again. This thread does get read by others, so I think it's valuable to continue to have suggestions.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone had chemo before surgery? Was it helpful? This is a recommendation for me. What do I need to expect? I don't want it to spread. Help

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    4 months 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      My Oncologist wanted me to do some chemo. prior to surgery (I'm assuming to try and shrink the tumor) but my Surgeon nixed the idea.

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Thank you for answering my question. I just met the oncologist. She recommended chemo first. Everything is so overwhelming right now. I think the fist chemo was a combo of something starting with the letter A and something with a T. I have to do it 1 x every 2 weeks for 4 times. Then I think she...

      more

      Thank you for answering my question. I just met the oncologist. She recommended chemo first. Everything is so overwhelming right now. I think the fist chemo was a combo of something starting with the letter A and something with a T. I have to do it 1 x every 2 weeks for 4 times. Then I think she said Taxol?? 1 x every week for 4 weeks.? That is my entire summer doing chemo. Can you give me any ideas on what to expect?? She said i will definately loose my hair, tired and nausea. I have to be there for 2-3 hours. I get a port put in next week. Any idea on what to expect with that? I am so scared and overwhelmed. I don't know how will do this. She wants to start chemo in 2 weeks. I have tons of tests to get done. It is so much in a short time? What should I expect?

      4 comments
Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word