loading... close

Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Asma Boubekri Profile

    My mom found a 4cm lump in her breast. Do you think it's cancer? (keep her in your prayers please)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Asma, finding a lump can be very scary. Lumps can be cancerous or non-cancerous. Every lump should be checked out ASAP. Has your Mom been to her Dr? If not, make sure she goes and have all the proper tests done. Eighty percent of lumps end up being benign but they should always be checked out...

      more

      Hi Asma, finding a lump can be very scary. Lumps can be cancerous or non-cancerous. Every lump should be checked out ASAP. Has your Mom been to her Dr? If not, make sure she goes and have all the proper tests done. Eighty percent of lumps end up being benign but they should always be checked out soon! Early detection is key!! I pray that your Mom will be o.k. Hugs

      7 comments
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Should you tell your 10 year old daughter if you've been diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Misty Wells Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes you should... my 10

      Comment
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, let her be a part of your journey. It will build your relationship and she will grow up understanding why early detection is so important.

      Comment
  • Karen G Profile

    I am going in for my Oncoplasty surgery tomorrow. Please pray for me and wish me clear margins. This is my third surgery and my last try to keep my breast. If this doesn't work I will need a Mastectomy.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 6 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      God bless and praying for you

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Surgery isn't easy but God willing you will go through this surgery and be much healthier in the end. You are in all of our prayers. Take care, jayme

      Comment
  • Sarah Foster Profile

    My mom is HER2 positive. Is there a test that I can have done to see if I am a carrier?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Mary Foti Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I am sorry about your mom's diagnosis. If you decide to get genetic testing, make sure you see a genetic counselor and/or a geneticist and ask that doctor if you are a candidate for BART testing. The genetic testing process is more complex than most people think. Your geneticist can explain the...

      more

      I am sorry about your mom's diagnosis. If you decide to get genetic testing, make sure you see a genetic counselor and/or a geneticist and ask that doctor if you are a candidate for BART testing. The genetic testing process is more complex than most people think. Your geneticist can explain the different available tests. There is "basic" testing and BART testing. My mother, who has fought breast cancer 3 times, tested BRCA negative after her first diagnosis in 2006 but she in fact really wasn't. (She only had the "basic" test). When I was diagnosed in 2010, I consulted a geneticist with enough brains to order BART genetic testing for me, which confirmed I have a BRCA2 mutation. My mother was re-tested and is also positive. Several cousins were subsequently tested and are also positive. If I hadn't had the BART test, they would not have known. Genetic testing is a scary process but it can give you and your family potentially life-saving information.

      3 comments
    • Becky G Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Yes. It's the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genetic test to see if you carry the breast cancer gene. Having the gene doesn't necessarily mean you will get breast cancer, but it may increase your chances and give you information to take care of yourself and be proactive.
      Here is some information from...

      more

      Yes. It's the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genetic test to see if you carry the breast cancer gene. Having the gene doesn't necessarily mean you will get breast cancer, but it may increase your chances and give you information to take care of yourself and be proactive.
      Here is some information from www.breastcenter.com on the test:
      In 1994, the first gene associated with breast cancer — BRCA1 (for BReast CAncer1) was identified on chromosome 17. A year later, a second gene associated with breast cancer — BRCA2 — was discovered on chromosome 13. When individuals carry a mutated form of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, they have an increased risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer at some point in their lives. Children of parents with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have a 50 percent chance of inheriting the gene mutation.

      Your Mom's doctor would probably be able to refer you to a genetic counselor to have the test done. They do take a sample of your spit instead of a blood test now. It's an easy test to take, but can cost quite a bit (fyi).

      Hope that helps!

      Good luck and all the best to your Mom!!!

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word