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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Had 2nd treatment. My hair is falling out and my scalp is red and itchy. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Oh, that was awful. I have really thick hair and when it started to fall out my head really hurt! I had it shaved off and it immediately felt better. When it's gone be sure to keep your scalp moisturized. I used a touch of baby oil.

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      It usually gets itchy before falling out. Ask your onco bout something to help with that. Its very upsetting to lose your hair, but mine grew back so much nicer. Hang in there.

      Comment
  • Theresa Hoekstra Profile

    Why are people not talking about Thermology for early detection?

    Asked by anonymous

    Industry Provider
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Jody  Feil Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      I think this is a great question? I don't know much about it. Perhaps you can explain what it is?

      3 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Industry Provider

      Thermology is a diagnostic infrared imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer. It doesn't use any form of radiation and there is no compression of the breasts. The National Cancer Institute website lists it as as able to detect breast cancer earlier than any other modality and it...

      more

      Thermology is a diagnostic infrared imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer. It doesn't use any form of radiation and there is no compression of the breasts. The National Cancer Institute website lists it as as able to detect breast cancer earlier than any other modality and it has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for almost thirty years. Thermology is based upon characteristic heat patterns caused by the abnormal blood flow of cancer, similar to MRI. There is a great deal of scientific basis for thermology but there are not pervasive standards of practice that assure quality from every facility so it is important to do some research first. Check out the Wikipedia listing and infraredmedicalsolutions.com for more information.

      Comment
  • Rosanna Wieder Profile

    Have to have drain in for another week. Found out 20 of the 26 lymph nodes removed had cancer in them. Having one of those days. Just feel like crying. Any help?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 7 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I give myself 24 hour pity party. Cry, feel sorry for my self, and the very popular why mes. Then it is time to fight like you have never fought before. We are all there for you. God Bless your journey.

      3 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Rosanna,
      That is a lousy bit of news and I think the positive spin on this is knowing they are OUT of your body. You will march on and complete the rest of your treatment just like all of your sister-warriors. We are all fighting this tough opponement. You and your pro-team are winning this...

      more

      Rosanna,
      That is a lousy bit of news and I think the positive spin on this is knowing they are OUT of your body. You will march on and complete the rest of your treatment just like all of your sister-warriors. We are all fighting this tough opponement. You and your pro-team are winning this one. Your surgeon wiped out the "front-line" and now you are going after breast cancer's ~snipers~
      Rosanna, you put on your game-face and charge ahead!!! You are strong and fearless.
      We got your back, sista! Hang in there, you can do this. Sharon

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have just been diagnost with Metestaic Breast cancer. Mass in left side of my neck, spread to lumbar, throasic spine, pelvis and lumphs nodes. Doc is starting Xeloda (oral chemo) Has anyone else taken this med?

    Asked by anonymous

    almost 4 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • jo m Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I haven't tried it yet either but it is a strong consideration for my possibly next treatment after PET scan results this week. I have bone mets from breast cancer.my doctor said possible side effects from Xeloda are sore hands and feet and to a much lesser percentage nausea, diarrhea and, and...

      more

      I haven't tried it yet either but it is a strong consideration for my possibly next treatment after PET scan results this week. I have bone mets from breast cancer.my doctor said possible side effects from Xeloda are sore hands and feet and to a much lesser percentage nausea, diarrhea and, and low blood count. The other consideration fore is aromasin and affinities. Currently, Iam on faslodex injections. I seem to be feeling some better but tumor markers are up twice in a row. I will keep you close inc thoughts and prayers. This bone mets is a difficult new journey for me.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      May I ask if you had any symptoms? Prayers are with you.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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