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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    When do I schedule the oncologist?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Your surgeon should give you a referral to oncologist other wise see you gp

      Comment
  • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile

    How do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 1996
    over 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 1996

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered...

      more

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered with simple words. What I wanted them to understand was that I was very sick, that I was fighting hard and that there was a pretty good chance that I would win the battle. I tried to give a message of hope. 15 years later, we talk about it and they say they appreciated understanding progressively.

      1 comment
    • Elise Merchant Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me...

      more

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me straight out that it was and that she was going to be fine :)

      1 comment
  • Miesha Brunson Profile

    What's the best way to prevent Breast Cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      SELF EXAM! SELF EXAM! SELF EXAM! eat right, exercise, try not to be tôo much overweight, take enough vit D3... This could help, but not avoid. Unfortunately there's nothing to avoid cancer, but we have to keep our eyes opened, have regular check ups and self exam so, AT LEAST we find it early...

      more

      SELF EXAM! SELF EXAM! SELF EXAM! eat right, exercise, try not to be tôo much overweight, take enough vit D3... This could help, but not avoid. Unfortunately there's nothing to avoid cancer, but we have to keep our eyes opened, have regular check ups and self exam so, AT LEAST we find it early enough to treat it successfully!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    my friend undergoes 3 times lymph removal surgery.recently she is again diagnosed with a swelling in left breast.earlier biopsy results was negative.is it cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 2 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Have they done a biopsy on her lymph nodes to see why they keep swelling? Lymph nodes will swell when there is an infection somewhere in her body to help fight off an infection. has she been sick lately?

      2 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Has she has any other tests like an MRI? If she has had 3 biopsy's, in those places biopsied, there was no cancer found. Can she go someplace else for a second opinion? Swelling doesn't automatically mean cancer, it is just the worst case scenario. They look for that and if it is negative,...

      more

      Has she has any other tests like an MRI? If she has had 3 biopsy's, in those places biopsied, there was no cancer found. Can she go someplace else for a second opinion? Swelling doesn't automatically mean cancer, it is just the worst case scenario. They look for that and if it is negative, they need to look for something different that is causing the swelling.. This could be a hormone related problem. It is difficult for us to say what is causing it and if it is not cancer. We have no idea and since we are not doctor's we are just taking a wild guess. Tell her to get a second opinion. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

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