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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Carol Braunstein Profile

    At what level of output can a drain be removed following axillary lymph node removal for breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      That's a decision for your surgeon. Mine could have been removed 5 days post op but she elected to keep them in an additional 5 days to be safe. She said she didn't want to have to put them back in if needed. She did remove 45cc of fluid in another 9 days but said that was very minimal for...

      more

      That's a decision for your surgeon. Mine could have been removed 5 days post op but she elected to keep them in an additional 5 days to be safe. She said she didn't want to have to put them back in if needed. She did remove 45cc of fluid in another 9 days but said that was very minimal for that time frame. A few weeks later the OT thought I had built up some more and 22cc were removed that time but none since.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Mine were also removed 6 days after surgery mastectomy w/immediate reconstruction last Tuesday. 20cc they were removed. You will b a little swollen after drains removed. I was so happy to take a real.shower

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    I just found out I got breast cancer I dont have money or insurance to pay for surgery what should I do?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Perhaps your hospital or imaging center has a patient navigator. They should be able to help you find what you need and they don't charge for their services. I used one more for comfort than anything else but she was there for me, even observed my surgery at the invite of the surgeon whom she...

      more

      Perhaps your hospital or imaging center has a patient navigator. They should be able to help you find what you need and they don't charge for their services. I used one more for comfort than anything else but she was there for me, even observed my surgery at the invite of the surgeon whom she knows very well. A hospital social worker maybe another resource available.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      check with the state you live in they might have programs for people with serious illnesses. You may also qualify for Medicaid which is a Federal program. I would do what Betti had suggested 1st...they can point you in the right direction. Don't forget about contacting your local American...

      more

      check with the state you live in they might have programs for people with serious illnesses. You may also qualify for Medicaid which is a Federal program. I would do what Betti had suggested 1st...they can point you in the right direction. Don't forget about contacting your local American Cancer society, they might also direct you. You can also "google" "help for cancer patient no insurance in (enter your state)" You have to hunt for the help....you can do a lot of searching right on the internet. Good luck to you. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I am wondering if anyone has had persistent fatigue after breast cancer, radiation and taking Tamoxifen 20 mg? I am 3 years out and have to nap every day! I sometimes feel like the radiation destroyed me!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years 16 answers
    • View all 16 answers
    • Buster OBuster Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      7 month survivor, radiation, no chemo, taking arimidex. Fatigue has been the worse side effect.

      4 comments
    • Kim Flackey Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I hear you! I go to bed at about 8 pm every night and am still exhausted when I get up. I do get out and exercise and I have heard that the more you exercise, the more energy you feel like you have. Do you think it's the chemo drugs? I am wondering if that's what it is? When you read about the...

      more

      I hear you! I go to bed at about 8 pm every night and am still exhausted when I get up. I do get out and exercise and I have heard that the more you exercise, the more energy you feel like you have. Do you think it's the chemo drugs? I am wondering if that's what it is? When you read about the exhaustion, you can't really wrap your head around it until you have it. Did your brain go, too? I feel like I have a hard time focusing and remembering, too, after radiation. God bless you and keep you safe!

      17 comments
  • Sharon Hull Profile

    What is octotype cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Oncotype DX is a special genetic test. The lab where your specimen is sends a piece of the tumor to a place in California where they conduct several genetic tests on it to determine more of its makeup, if chemo. is needed, reoccurance rate, etc. The score ranges from 0-100 and depending on the...

      more

      Oncotype DX is a special genetic test. The lab where your specimen is sends a piece of the tumor to a place in California where they conduct several genetic tests on it to determine more of its makeup, if chemo. is needed, reoccurance rate, etc. The score ranges from 0-100 and depending on the number your onc. can tell you if chemo. is needed or not. Ask if they have a phamlet on it as my oncology clinic did and it was very useful. I believe your tumor has to be low grade and not in the lymph nodes to fit their patterns for testing as I recall. You can google Oncotype DX test and should get some info. that way, too.

      2 comments
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Oncotype DX tests help to determine if chemo would be beneficial in a breast cancer patient's specific case. many test are done on a portion of the tumor removed by the breast surgeon. And an onco score is assigned based specifically on the persons own cancer cells.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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