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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • pam thomblison Profile

    Two weeks ago I was diagnosed with high grade DCIS. I was told I need a mastectomy. My question is "How long do I have to wait around before my cancer spreads?"

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I guess I'm not really understanding. If you know you have cancer, why would you not want it out as soon as possible? Why do you want to 'wait around for it to spread'?! Being scared is normal. This is all very do-able. We are here for you. Prayers to you.

      4 comments
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I can't tell from your question but call your surgeon for a consult. It is very important you get your questions answered so you can figure out your course of treatment. I believe an informed patient is very important part of the breast cancer treatment.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Does IBC reoccur in the back, after surgery and radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I think recurrance can happen in a variety of areas of the body. One can't say where it would happen if it did. If you are having continueing discomfort, or something out of the norm. contact your oncologist asap. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • teresa skaff Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      From everything I have read it occurs in the brain, bones, lungs, and liver. Other areas are not too common with ibc, but of course like all cancers it can spread anywhere. I have ibc.

      Comment
  • toni chillious Profile

    I just received my surgery date for and double mastectomy with reconstruction expanders, can anyone tell me how long will the hospital stay will be?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      It's hard to believe, but I was only in the hospital for 23 hours... most women I know stayed one night, too. Best wishes for a smooth surgery and recovery. Keep the questions coming! We are here for you!

      Comment
    • Cindy Rathbun Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was in for two nights for bi-lateral mastectomy with expanders placed. I was told to expect one night stay, but it became two nights. I felt pretty good. The drains were out in a week. The less you move your arms or use them, the faster you will complete the drainage process. Best wishes!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Treatment at the end of this week! Very nervous! I am booked for chemo unless my gene study proves other wise. Has anyone else been involved in the gene study?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Some questions. If one or both of you have had a lumpectomy or a partial mastectomy, I have not heard any mention of radiation which is standard care for breast conservation. Did I understand the surgery correctly?
      Are y'all talking about the OncotypeDX test sent off to determine ER,PR, Her2...

      more

      Some questions. If one or both of you have had a lumpectomy or a partial mastectomy, I have not heard any mention of radiation which is standard care for breast conservation. Did I understand the surgery correctly?
      Are y'all talking about the OncotypeDX test sent off to determine ER,PR, Her2 positive or negative and the percentage of recurrence and the benefit of chemo? I may be wrong and one of the girls who has done this will clarify it, but if you have lymph node involvement I think chemo is standard. I hope some of the women who post regularly that have had this scenerio in their treatment will jump in. The process is slow when waiting but I would call the doctor with any questions to clarify what options are ahead . My chemo was to be after the radiation but my DX test showed no benefit worth the risks. Good luck and take care. Jo :-D

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yes, iwas tested for the BRC1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, if that's what you mean. Mine came pack positive for BRCA2. My Oncotype also was very high, adding to the chance of recurrence. It sure wasn't what I wanted, but there's nothing I can do about it except remain diligent and have frequent...

      more

      Yes, iwas tested for the BRC1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, if that's what you mean. Mine came pack positive for BRCA2. My Oncotype also was very high, adding to the chance of recurrence. It sure wasn't what I wanted, but there's nothing I can do about it except remain diligent and have frequent checkups.

      Comment

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