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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Donna Sawyer Profile

    What is red breast syndrome? What causes it? How long does it last?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      The easiest thing to do is "google" the term RED BREAST SYNDROME. It is difficult to estimate duration because we are all different. It will take as long as it takes you each individual. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • T H Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Hi Donna, Think I may have it... My doctor does not think it is a infection. My right breast is red in a are by my ins

      2 comments
  • Brenda Jackson Profile

    What should I expect on my 1st visit with my Oncologist? I know I won't be getting chemo that day, but what will I find out?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Brenda,

      Please record your appointment or take along a relative or friend to take notes. YOu will get a bunch of information and you won't be able to remember it all. You will review your tests results. You may get to see the percentages on a website called Adjunctive Online or something like...

      more

      Brenda,

      Please record your appointment or take along a relative or friend to take notes. YOu will get a bunch of information and you won't be able to remember it all. You will review your tests results. You may get to see the percentages on a website called Adjunctive Online or something like that. You will hear the pluses and minuses of treatments..... side effects etc. You will hear the type of chemo, and how many rounds you will have to have. How long your treatment will take and any post chemo hormone therapy. You will discuss your surgery in a general way but this is primarily chemo./radiation treatment. If you have questions no matter how small, ask them! I agree with Nancy, your treatment will now take off and not more waiting! You will have your plan laid out in front of you and you will probably take comfort in actually knowing what will be happening. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • terri best Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      With my first appt. I met the Dr. and his nurses. We talked for a while, he examined me and then we went over my treatment options. We decided to do the Oncotype test and PET/CT scan before starting chemo. The Oncotype is being done and I haven't heard if insurance has ok'd the PET. They denied...

      more

      With my first appt. I met the Dr. and his nurses. We talked for a while, he examined me and then we went over my treatment options. We decided to do the Oncotype test and PET/CT scan before starting chemo. The Oncotype is being done and I haven't heard if insurance has ok'd the PET. They denied the Oncotype but its being appealed. The lab had to get my ok to do it and said I wouldn't have any out-of-pocket. Now I wait for the results.

      Comment
  • Evelyn H. Profile

    My mom started with chemo last Tuesday. Yesterday she ate some fruits, but today she only ate gelatine and an apple because she has nausea and vomiting. I wonder if its normal the fact of don’t want to eat anything and how many days it could last?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Evelyn,
      Since this was her first, nobody, even the oncologist doesn't know how she will react. At her next appointment, she needs to TELL them what her reactions were. They can tweak her anti-nausea meds and make things better for her. I was given a drug called "Emend" and never had any...

      more

      Evelyn,
      Since this was her first, nobody, even the oncologist doesn't know how she will react. At her next appointment, she needs to TELL them what her reactions were. They can tweak her anti-nausea meds and make things better for her. I was given a drug called "Emend" and never had any nausea. The other reaction she may experience and there is nothing that can be done for this is your sense of smell and taste can change during your treatment. Food can take on an odd taste and you become picky about what you can eat.
      Some foods cooking, you can't tolerate. Again this is temporary and fairly common. You just have to go with it. I ended up craving greens.... salads, spinach, and "hot pockets" (frozen sandwiches you heat in the microwave). It is funny to hear the combinations of things women eat when they are on chemo.
      The best thing is to work with the oncologist for anti-nausea meds. Things can be made to be a LOT more comfy. Hang in there.... take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Have her talk to her onc. They know her case best and will give her suggestions for the nausea or maybe a new medication. During chemo I mostly ate yogurt, crackers, and chocolate ensure.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Will radiation hurt?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Tricia Hensey Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sometimes it just felt like a bad sunburn. Dealing with the fatigue from radiation was more difficult.

      Comment
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      One of the side effects of radiation is burning at the area of the breast where radiation is targeted, but treatment centers provide special cream that can be used on the area. I had 36 radiation treatments with no burn. My oncologist recommended and said she saw best results when she had...

      more

      One of the side effects of radiation is burning at the area of the breast where radiation is targeted, but treatment centers provide special cream that can be used on the area. I had 36 radiation treatments with no burn. My oncologist recommended and said she saw best results when she had patients using aloe vera from the plant which I used every day during treatment. I would just cut off a leaf and rub the gel on the area. It was quite amazing how well it worked for me. Many garden centers sell aloe Vera plants.

      1 comment

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