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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 2 - Standard Treatment & Clinical Trials

Before selecting your treatment plan, you should first understand the difference between standard treatment and clinical trials.

Standard treatments are methods that experts agree are appropriate, accepted and widely used. These standard procedures have proven useful in fighting breast cancer in the past. A clinical trial, on the other hand, is an approved research study that some doctors believe has a strong potential to improve standard treatments. When clinical trials demonstrate better results than the standard, that new treatment becomes the standard. Remember, all our current standards were clinical trials at one time.

If a clinical trial is an option for you, your doctor will explain the possible trade-offs with the trial treatment versus standard treatment. Together with your medical team, you will need to decide what treatment method is the best for you and your health.

Let’s look more closely at the standard treatments your doctors may recommend.

Related Questions

  • Mary Denoble Profile

    Is there a way to prevent weight gain with post menopause hormone suppression therapy ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I agree. Exercise & watch your calorie & fat intake. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Exercise and good eating habits. I get myself motivated by knowing that exercise and a good weight are the best defense for the keeping the cancer from coming back.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone with issues having radiation to implants?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      When I had partial mastectomy and nodes removed, I also had implant exchange. My radiologist and breast surgeon agreed this was best, as I had very old implants. The rads/partial mastectomy side is firmer , not as soft as the non rads side. At my last follow up appt the plastic surgeon told me...

      more

      When I had partial mastectomy and nodes removed, I also had implant exchange. My radiologist and breast surgeon agreed this was best, as I had very old implants. The rads/partial mastectomy side is firmer , not as soft as the non rads side. At my last follow up appt the plastic surgeon told me to do sort of a exercise/massage thing everyday to prevent hardening. I do have some soreness and mild pain sometimes. As far as shape and the breasts matching, the ps made adjustments in implant size to make sure they match perfectly. Also, my radiation was very precise, above the implant (which is under the muscle), I think it was called IMRT.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I didn't have implants but my chemo buddy had to have one removed.

      Comment
  • Cindi Jay jay  Profile

    Are side effects from chemo pretty consistent; treatment to treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 3 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Everyone's body handles chemo. differently so imagine from treatment to treatment it could be the same or totally different from the one prior. I'm not a doctor just guessing as I never really had what I would call side effects. The only one I recall was my first infusion and when the first...

      more

      Everyone's body handles chemo. differently so imagine from treatment to treatment it could be the same or totally different from the one prior. I'm not a doctor just guessing as I never really had what I would call side effects. The only one I recall was my first infusion and when the first chemo. med. was started I got an immediate hot flash, I informed the nurse and she turned the flow rate down and it went away, never occurred again so imagine she made a note in my chart.

      5 comments
    • Trisha Muller Quinn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      Yes everyone is different... my Chemo was bad !

      I put on heaps of water weight ( almost 25 kgs) from the steroids..
      I was sick for about 7 days after each dose and it got worser !! Till the very end ( 6 sessions in total) the changer the meds so 3 of each drug
      I cried for my hubby not to take...

      more

      Yes everyone is different... my Chemo was bad !

      I put on heaps of water weight ( almost 25 kgs) from the steroids..
      I was sick for about 7 days after each dose and it got worser !! Till the very end ( 6 sessions in total) the changer the meds so 3 of each drug
      I cried for my hubby not to take me to the last one .... but looking back .. it ( the treatment) was the best thing I could have done for me !!

      I know people who fly through it and back to work the next day .. but it depends on the job you do also due to losing all your white blood cells. And maybe more chance to pick up some bad bugs !!

      So good luck with your treatment and " Do" what is best for you !! With help from your doctor , family and friends ... don't worry too much about others !! As all Chemo is tailor made for you and your Cancer !! 🌷

      Comment
  • Kathy Whyte Profile

    How long until I get REAL hair after chemo? I have the beginnings of peach fuzz right now...did AC AND THEN T chemo.....finished 10 days ago....mastectomy and radiation are next

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3B Patient
    almost 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      About 6 weeks it will look like a short buzz cut. The fuzz will start to turn into hair. By 3-4 months you'll be able to get it trimmed to look like an intentional cut and not look so much like a cancer patient. Don't be surprised if you lose your eyebrows or eyelashes after chemo (mine fell...

      more

      About 6 weeks it will look like a short buzz cut. The fuzz will start to turn into hair. By 3-4 months you'll be able to get it trimmed to look like an intentional cut and not look so much like a cancer patient. Don't be surprised if you lose your eyebrows or eyelashes after chemo (mine fell out a month after...) but they grew back quickly. Also, I got that fuzz like on my head but on my face (ugh...) it will also go away. I couldn't stand it so I got it waxed once. Best to you!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Like a baby you are starting all over again curable around seven months. Coverage before then and styling much later than that. The fuzz is just a phase.
      Wish I could stick some on for you and me

      Comment

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