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Gloria Taylor Edwards's Story

About her story

A 2013 year-end message from a one-year breast cancer survivor; shares encouragement to continue the fight for a cure

Related Questions

  • Alexandra Gomez Profile

    What age can girls get breast cancer ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Alice Eisele Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      • A Women's breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman's first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women's breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones,...

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      • A Women's breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman's first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women's breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones, including hormone disrupters in the environment.

      • As with many other diseases, your risk of breast cancer goes up as you get older. For example, according to the American Cancer Society, about 1 out of 8 invasive breast cancers develop in women younger than 45. About 2 out of 3 invasive breast cancers are found in women 55 or older. In fact, the aging process is the biggest risk factor for breast cancer. That's because the longer we live, there are more opportunities for genetic damage (mutations) in the body. And as we age, our bodies are less capable of repairing genetic damage.

      • About 1 in 8 women in the United States (12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

      • A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. About 20-30% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have a family history of breast cancer.

      These steps will help lower your risk:
      • maintaining a healthy weight
      • exercising regularly
      • limiting alcohol
      • eating nutritious food
      • never smoking (or quitting if you do smoke)

      Comment
    • Jessica Worcester Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I'm 20

      Comment
  • Deborah Wills Profile

    T4 Ni Mo

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is tumor staging.... T= tumor N=nodes M=mets (spread) Here is a website to explain it. BUT.... if this is about you.... YOU NEED TO TALK TO YOUR ONCOLOGIST! You may take this completely out of context and scare yourself. ...

      more

      This is tumor staging.... T= tumor N=nodes M=mets (spread) Here is a website to explain it. BUT.... if this is about you.... YOU NEED TO TALK TO YOUR ONCOLOGIST! You may take this completely out of context and scare yourself.
      http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/staging
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      If you look up how to read a pathology report it will tell you . I forgot which web site I used.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    After you've had breast cancer, how often should you get mammograms?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Lori S Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      At least every 6 months seems to be the norm.

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My physicians are having me get mammograms every 6 months and do self exams monthly. Good luck to you!

      Comment
  • Rafi Togoo Profile

    My mother (65 years old) has stage 4 breast cancer with bone metastasis. She is advised herceptin and chemotherapy every three weeks. Chemotherapy is for 6 cycles. How long do we have to continue with herceptin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Catherine Nodurft Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Sometimes doctors prescribe Herceptin for 1+ years, but it depends. Ask her oncologist what they recommend for your mother's case.

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I had chemotherapy with herceptin for 5 treatments n then another 9 months, every three weeks, of herceptin.

      Comment

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