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Gloria Taylor Edwards's Story

About her story

A 2013 year-end message from a one-year breast cancer survivor; shares encouragement to continue the fight for a cure

Related Questions

  • patty pat Profile

    What is a grade 3 tumor?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      This depends on whether your laboratory is reporting using the English/Australian system often called the Nottingham Index or Bloom and Richardson VERSUS the American system.

      You did not say which country you were posting from.

      The answer above is correct for US and US based tumour rating...

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      This depends on whether your laboratory is reporting using the English/Australian system often called the Nottingham Index or Bloom and Richardson VERSUS the American system.

      You did not say which country you were posting from.

      The answer above is correct for US and US based tumour rating systems BUT in the Nottingham Index used in UK, Australia etc a Grade 3 means three individual scores of 1 [lowest risk] added together equals 3. Which under that system is the LOWEST score or the least aggressive form of cancer, not the more aggressive.

      Comment
    • sandy glisman Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I believe the grade is for agressiveness. 1. is mild, 2. moderate and 3. very agressive.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    what does P2 mean?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      What is it in regard to?

      Comment
    • claire stafford Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just saw it on my notes when the doctor gave them over before my mammogram. It stated P2. Just wondered what that meant. Had a mammogram on Thur and not heard of the results as of yet. I am assuming that they would have got back to me by now if it was anything serious.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    After Triple Neg. breast cancer treatment do you go back and see your surgeon or just the oncologist?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      My surgery was 18 months ago. I followed up with the surgeon for the first year. I am still following up with the plastic surgeon every six months. So far, I have been going to the oncologist every six months, after mammo, blood, and bone tests.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      After my post op. Checks my surgeon said there was no need to come back and see her. I then moved into the oncology part of treatment. This can probably differ from one case to the next. You just follow the guidelines of your treatment protocol. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I don't understand what breast cancer is.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is from Breastcancer.org.

      Breast cancer is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells. To better understand breast cancer, it helps to understand how any cancer can develop.

      Cancer occurs as a result of mutations, or abnormal changes, in the genes responsible for regulating the growth of...

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      This is from Breastcancer.org.

      Breast cancer is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells. To better understand breast cancer, it helps to understand how any cancer can develop.

      Cancer occurs as a result of mutations, or abnormal changes, in the genes responsible for regulating the growth of cells and keeping them healthy. The genes are in each cell’s nucleus, which acts as the “control room” of each cell. Normally, the cells in our bodies replace themselves through an orderly process of cell growth: healthy new cells take over as old ones die out. But over time, mutations can “turn on” certain genes and “turn off” others in a cell. That changed cell gains the ability to keep dividing without control or order, producing more cells just like it and forming a tumor.

      A tumor can be benign (not dangerous to health) or malignant (has the potential to be dangerous). Benign tumors are not considered cancerous: their cells are close to normal in appearance, they grow slowly, and they do not invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Left unchecked, malignant cells eventually can spread beyond the original tumor to other parts of the body.

      The term “breast cancer” refers to a malignant tumor that has developed from cells in the breast. Usually breast cancer either begins in the cells of the lobules, which are the milk-producing glands, or the ducts, the passages that drain milk from the lobules to the nipple. Less commonly, breast cancer can begin in the stromal tissues, which include the fatty and fibrous connective tissues of the breast.

      Over time, cancer cells can invade nearby healthy breast tissue and make their way into the underarm lymph nodes, small organs that filter out foreign substances in the body. If cancer cells get into the lymph nodes, they then have a pathway into other parts of the body. The breast cancer’s stage refers to how far the cancer cells have spread beyond the original tumor (see Stages of Breast Cancer table for more information).

      Breast cancer is always caused by a genetic abnormality (a “mistake” in the genetic material). However, only 5-10% of cancers are due to an abnormality inherited from your mother or father. About 90% of breast cancers are due to genetic abnormalities that happen as a result of the aging process and the “wear and tear” of life in general.

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      It's a plague that kills way to many people. 1 in 8 women will be touched by breast cancer. I don't know how many men are affected wvery year. It's mazing what you can tolerate when your life is on the line. My montra is "my canceris pink but my will is iron."

      Comment

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